Author Topic: Internet radios - an interesting list  (Read 15490 times)

A. Black

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Re: Internet radios - an interesting list
« Reply #15 on: 17:30:12 | 05 August, 2014 »
Any Bose owners who might offer some insight as to wether Bose lives up to its price tag ?

I have a white Bose Wave system (AM/FM/CD) in the Kitchen and my wife really likes it a lot.  The sound is great, you can really ramp it up without distortion (although we rarely do that), it looks sharp, it is particularly good at pulling in weak FM stations even without an addon antenna, its user interface is intuitive and the Bose service is excellent.  The remote broke after 3 years but they sent me a replacement for free.  They do sell a higher quality addon remote and I might get that.  One can also get universal remotes that work with it (not from Bose).  On Amazon some people complained about the quality of the CD drive so with the possible exception of that and the remote the radio seems to be of pretty high quality. 

My father has a black Bose Wave (his is a newer model with RDS) and he keeps his in the TV room and pipes the sound from his TV through it.  He also has Bose headphones and is very pleased with the Bose equipment he has.

Even though they are not cheap I don't think most people would be sorry with the purchase and I would recommend it.  One advantage of getting equipment that is really good is that you no longer feel you have to spend more money to get something better since you already have one of the best.  Also compared to cable TV, say, its really not so expensive since there is no ongoing cost to a radio. I have already had it for 4 years and expect it to last 10 to 20 years so if it costs $500 then it costs $25 to $50 per year.  If by spending half as much it only lasts half as long you haven't really saved anything at all and probably don't have as good a radio.

Regarding internet radio I don't have a Bose internet radio so can't comment on that.


« Last Edit: 17:33:35 | 05 August, 2014 by A. Black »

Pablo

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Re: Internet radios - an interesting list
« Reply #16 on: 22:08:25 | 05 August, 2014 »
Thanks A.Black:

I inherited a Bose AM/FM wave radio which was a stout and reliable bedside companion until the advent of Internet Radio.  Now it sits on a dresser and serves as a clock; its halcyon days long numbered and just one spring cleaning away from Tatooine... my late uncle's memory notwithstanding.

The Bose Soundtouch on sale at Le Target attempts to entice with the promise of it having internet radio capability. However (as noted previously) this is true only in some gossamer, evanescent fashion. One can download six stations, barely more than a handful.

Bose does not seem to be alone in this regard.  While the trajectory of technology seems to bend towards cyber reception- if for no other reason than the sheer choice of some thousands of stations- the industry seems to husband resources by remaining loyaly-wedded to terrestrial reception. Internet radio capability being a clumsy afterthought which does not afford easy choices or selectivity one gets via an aggregator like Reciva or Frontier while at the same time touting terrible twin spouses (useless eleemosynary spice appendages- IMO) Pandora and Sirius/XM.

I raised the issue because my present internet radios lack the rich stereo sound one gets with a traditional high end system.. so niggling my sub-conscience is this notion that perhaps there are audio limitations yet to be surmounted... That has impelled my questioning the efficacy of the Bose Soundtouch as an internet radio being a partial interim sound solution. But this short lived idea is already so happily forgotten that no amount of fish oil can resurrect.






« Last Edit: 18:06:59 | 06 August, 2014 by Pablo »

A. Black

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Re: Internet radios - an interesting list
« Reply #17 on: 06:33:34 | 06 August, 2014 »
I inherited a Bose AM/FM wave radio which was a stout and reliable bedside companion until the advent of Internet Radio.  Now it sits on a dresser and serves as a clock; its halcyon days long numbered and just one spring cleaning away from Tatooine... my late uncle's memory notwithstanding.

Try connecting the output or headphone jack of your internet radio to the input jack of your Bose Wave to listen to the internet radio via the Bose.
« Last Edit: 08:31:38 | 06 August, 2014 by A. Black »

Pablo

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Re: Internet radios - an interesting list
« Reply #18 on: 17:50:56 | 06 August, 2014 »
I inherited a Bose AM/FM wave radio which was a stout and reliable bedside companion until the advent of Internet Radio.  Now it sits on a dresser and serves as a clock; its halcyon days long numbered and just one spring cleaning away from Tatooine... my late uncle's memory notwithstanding.

Try connecting the output or headphone jack of your internet radio to the input jack of your Bose Wave to listen to the internet radio via the Bose.

You piqued my curiosity and so I am going to try in order to hear the enhancement, if any.  There is a single output on my WFR-28 and a duel in-feed on the Bose. On Saturday I'll cherchez le wire over at Best Buy or Radio Shack which matches this configuration while studiously avoiding the monster cable warned about earlier.. and report back over this weekend.

Now I am interested to know if any of the Refugees have a Sangean WFT-1 component ( or similar) integrated into a home stereo system: how does the audio integrity of the internet radio compare with terrestrial stereo fm ?

http://www.sangean.com/products/product.asp?mid=25&cid=2

Solo2

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Re: Internet radios - an interesting list
« Reply #19 on: 19:32:38 | 06 August, 2014 »
Now I am interested to know if any of the Refugees have a Sangean WFT-1 component ( or similar) integrated into a home stereo system: how does the audio integrity of the internet radio compare with terrestrial stereo fm ? http://www.sangean.com/products/product.asp?mid=25&cid=2

I have the Grace tuner connected via toslink to the Musical Fidelity V Dac and that connected to my stereo receiver.  I would say it sounds pretty damned good; at least as good as terrestrial fm, without the fm drift.

The reason I got involved with internet radio to begin with is because the FM reception in my house is lousy.  The plaster walls are built of steel diamond mesh lath, so the whole house acts like a big Faraday cage, making radio reception difficult.  I guess this would fall under drgeoff's "local interference."
« Last Edit: 08:08:43 | 07 August, 2014 by Solo2 »
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drgeoff

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Re: Internet radios - an interesting list
« Reply #20 on: 01:46:01 | 07 August, 2014 »
Now I am interested to know if any of the Refugees have a Sangean WFT-1 component ( or similar) integrated into a home stereo system: how does the audio integrity of the internet radio compare with terrestrial stereo fm ?
Won't that depend rather heavily on factors such as:
1.  The codec and bit rate used by the streaming source.
2.  Audio "enhancement" eg dynamic range compression used by the FM station
3.  Your received FM signal strength (ERP in your direction and distance from transmitter, path from transmitter including prevalence of flutter from aircraft, local interference sources, quality of antenna installation including downlead) etc
4.  Ability of complete path from internet radio source to your radio to sustain the used bit rate.
5.  Your personal sensitivities to different kinds of distortions/impairments.
etc?

In other words, whatever anyone reports back as an answer isn't going to be a reliable guide for you.  :)
« Last Edit: 01:48:08 | 07 August, 2014 by drgeoff »

Alan E Hill

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Re: Internet radios - an interesting list
« Reply #21 on: 03:28:06 | 07 August, 2014 »
Yeah! I mean, some people like Bose  ;)
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Pablo

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Re: Internet radios - an interesting list
« Reply #22 on: 08:54:54 | 07 August, 2014 »
Now I am interested to know if any of the Refugees have a Sangean WFT-1 component ( or similar) integrated into a home stereo system: how does the audio integrity of the internet radio compare with terrestrial stereo fm ?
Won't that depend rather heavily on factors such as:
1.  The codec and bit rate used by the streaming source.
2.  Audio "enhancement" eg dynamic range compression used by the FM station
3.  Your received FM signal strength (ERP in your direction and distance from transmitter, path from transmitter including prevalence of flutter from aircraft, local interference sources, quality of antenna installation including downlead) etc
4.  Ability of complete path from internet radio source to your radio to sustain the used bit rate.
5.  Your personal sensitivities to different kinds of distortions/impairments.
etc?

In other words, whatever anyone reports back as an answer isn't going to be a reliable guide for you.  :)

Partially, I suppose:  I agree that #1 & #4 are relevant in the evaluation while #2 & #3 are external factors which would remain a constant as I intend to listen only at home.  #5 being the reason I asked.

Now I will explain why:

Of my three internet radios the Sangean DDR-63 has the best audio sound for music yet this does not match the HD sound quality I get in my car:  it lacks the deep bass and lush treble and presence.  So I have this idea that it is possible to improve on the DDR-63 sound.
Meanwhile after our recent move within LA we find that many terrestrial FM stations are distorted, blocked by a mountain between us and the transmitters on Mt Wilson. For this reason alone I have not purchased a good component system as the receiver would not deliver what one would expect if one were living downtown.

So I am on the verge purchasing a component system anyway and want to make an investment commensurate with the precatory intended result:  will a $2k investment along with a  WFT-1 yield a substantially better sound than the DDR-63 ?  That is, can an internet radio integrated into a stereo component system approximate what one would normally associate with terrestrial fm... or in my case match the sound the radio in my car ?

We have a stereo system in our Taipei flat:  there the issue isn't sound quality, it's content.  My wife enjoys the Beijing operas which for me are er, an acquired taste. So I bring my WFR-28 w/headphones when I go there. Now I am leaning towards the WFT-1 in Taiwan as a quality comparison with the local fm  and a new component system in Los Angeles.. as long as the WFT-1 can trump the sound quality of the DDR-63. Besides as discussed earlier my WFR-28 may soon be tethered to a Bose.

So I welcome feedback from Refugees regarding the WFT-1 (or similar)  which will be filtered in light of my circumstance and at bottom will serve as a palliative justification for making an otherwise extravagant purchase; one made only to assuage a quest for quality. I suppose we all have poured money down the drain in the search for a better life.. the idea being as little as possible.



« Last Edit: 09:07:23 | 07 August, 2014 by Pablo »

castalla

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Re: Internet radios - an interesting list
« Reply #23 on: 10:11:44 | 07 August, 2014 »
Quote
will a $2k investment

2k for a radio system? 

Get a small arm powered device and a decent DAC for 1/10th of the cost and run LMS and Squeezelite on it.
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drgeoff

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Re: Internet radios - an interesting list
« Reply #24 on: 15:35:50 | 07 August, 2014 »
Loudspeaker differences usually swamp all other variables.  No integrated radio (ie with internal speakers) can give the same sound quality as something (of reasonable quality) feeding an amplifier and hi-fi speakers.

In the UK, I reckon the best (in the technical sense) source quality available to most people is the radio channels on the Astra satellite at 28.2 E.  However it is almost entirely national stations and doesn't have the local ones that are available on FM, DAB and internet.

drgeoff

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Re: Internet radios - an interesting list
« Reply #25 on: 15:44:33 | 07 August, 2014 »
Quote
will a $2k investment

2k for a radio system? 

Get a small arm powered device and a decent DAC for 1/10th of the cost and run LMS and Squeezelite on it.
Agreed though I think the $50 and upwards DACs are pointless for internet radio and any other source that has been compressed.

Anyway, any decent modern hi-fi or home cinema receiver will have SPDIF or HDMI.  For the former a $15 USB soundcard with SPDIF out is fine.  For the latter, a Raspberry Pi plugs straight in.

Pablo

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Re: Internet radios - an interesting list
« Reply #26 on: 19:26:58 | 07 August, 2014 »
Yes.. an amplifier and speakers will represent the bulk of the purchase.  My understanding in that the Sangean WFT-1 is a receiver which needs external speakers and an amp to operate.

Once done would you agree that the WFT-1 sound quality would approximate the sound quality of an fm station broadcasting in HD nearby to the intended listener ?


Perhaps something along the lines of the Onkyo TX-NR809 along with Fluance XL7F speakers.   These were recommended to me earlier today while a friend told me a vintage (vintage?) Sansui would also do the trick. Neither the shop or my friend would weigh in on the resulting quality once a WFT-1 is connected... so here is my plan:  I'll pickup the WFT-1 and connect it to my our stereo system in Taiwan... if our flat sounds like the inside of Abbey Road Studios hosting the Beijing Opera or inside Le Bar at La Trib 87.7 the next step will be an Onkyo or Sansui amplifier complimented with good speakers for here in LA.

If not,  perhaps the Bose in the bedroom once connected to the WFR-28 will be as good as it gets: I raised the issue because my present internet radios lack the rich stereo sound one gets with a traditional high end system.. so niggling my sub-conscience is this notion, now reinforced by the various comments here,  that perhaps there are audio limitations yet to be surmounted... until then, the DDR-63 in the living room kitchen area will do as will the WFR-20 in the office.
« Last Edit: 22:01:25 | 07 August, 2014 by Pablo »

Pablo

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Re: Internet radios - an interesting list
« Reply #27 on: 21:14:53 | 07 August, 2014 »
]The reason I got involved with internet radio to begin with is because the FM reception in my house is lousy.

But once bitten by the thousands of station offerings there is no going back.... honestly, the whole concept of having local stations from anywhere at my fingertips is the absolute cat's pajamas.
« Last Edit: 21:18:34 | 07 August, 2014 by Pablo »

Crystalset

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Re: Internet radios - an interesting list
« Reply #28 on: 01:43:29 | 08 August, 2014 »
My Roberts WM 201 fed thru a Yamaha AX 590 amp to KEF speakers is the icing on the cat's pajamas.

Solo2

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Re: Internet radios - an interesting list
« Reply #29 on: 04:33:50 | 08 August, 2014 »
Yes.. an amplifier and speakers will represent the bulk of the purchase. Perhaps something along the lines of the Onkyo TX-NR809 along with Fluance XL7F speakers.

If you want to avoid complication, you could get a receiver with integrated internet radio and networking capabilities.  Look at the Yamaha RN500 receiver.  It even includes the twin spouses' fairy godmother, Spotify Connect.  I have mine connected to the wonderful and cheap Pioneer Andrew Jones tower speakers.
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